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Cardboard models

Cardboard models can either be cut out using a Laser Cutter if you have access to one, or by using Autodesk 123D Make to make your own patterns and sizes using the downloadable files. Alternatively if you have the determination you can  download the PDF template to print out on a regular printer and glue the pattern on to some recycled cardboard to cut out the pieces for assembly.

We will soon preload several laser cut cardboard models that can be ordered from Ponoko in several card thicknesses.

These will be offered in a variety of sizes and materials and make an engaging project for use in classrooms. 

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afadmin
Cardboard models

Cardboard models can either be cut out using a Laser Cutter if you have access to one, or by using Autodesk 123D Make to make your own patterns and sizes using the downloadable files. Alternatively if you have the determination you can  download the PDF template to print out on a regular printer and glue the pattern on to some recycled cardboard to cut out the pieces for assembly.

We will soon preload several laser cut cardboard models that can be ordered from Ponoko in several card thicknesses.

These will be offered in a variety of sizes and materials and make an engaging project for use in classrooms. 

valentijn
cardboard model KNMER 1813 (Homo habilis)

Hello,

I have no access to a laser cutter so doing it all by hand. It's a puzzle I must say, especially the last tiny bits. I realy have no clue as where the ones with no lines and pinholes have to be placed. It concerns 1-1, 3-2, 4-2, 6-2, 7-2, 8-2, 9-2, 11-2, 1-3, 6-3, 8-3 and 6-4. Are they teeth as well? Any help would be appreciated! Thanks in advance.

See pictures for what I produced so far.

 

Attach Photos: 
Louise
From Louise Leakey

Valentijn

Many congratulations on assembling the skulls using hand cut cardboard, having done it myself I know how difficult it is. The small pieces are not much help and yes are some of the teeth. We generally do not use those small pieces as they are too fiddly to be helpful. You can perhaps look at the digital model and see where you could place them to build it out a bit but otherwise dont bother with stickign them on as its not easy to work them out.

Many thanks for sharing your models and posting photographs, this is wonderful. 

Ngechu
Ngechu's picture
KNMER 1813

Hello valentijn,

First of all the model that you made in reference is really good, kudos for that! The tiny bits that you find difficult to attach are actually teeth for the Homo habilis. If they are really tiny you can opt to discard them,though there's an alternative. Here's the plan, visit Autodesk's 3D apps site (http://www.123dapp.com/make) ,download and installAutodesk 123D Make software. Once successfully installed in your PC/Mac, download a 3D model of the Homo habilis from our site. Import the 3D file to 123D make and you can make your own model slices in whichever format you desire. 123D make also gives you the priviledge to see what slice(number) goes into what other number. Enjoy the experience

Regards,

Ngechu .

 

 

 

valentijn
Thank you all for your nice

Thank you all for your nice comments. Good to here I didn't mess it up to much..

@Ngechu: thank you for your suggestion by using '123D make'. Nice programm. Although I don't want to discard the tiny bits, I too find it hard to reconstruct the exact same shapes in '123D make' as I downloaded from your website (full size cardboard model/letter). Whatever I try, the shapes and number of pieces seem to differ and that makes it hard to compare. What exact input did you use to create the downloadable cardboardmodel? For dimensions, your website states 168*114*112 (the skull) and the use of 4mm thick cardboard. '123D make' however states different dimensions after import of the file. Hope to hear from you again. Many thanks. 

Disclaimer

The specimens displayed on this site are published specimens unless otherwise indicated. The information about the artifacts on this site is of a general nature only and unless otherwise indicated, has been written either by members of the African Fossils team, the National Museums of Kenya or the Turkana Basin Institute. The printed models are not of a high enough resolution to enable accurate scientific measurements and have generated using photogrammetry and in some cases low resolution digital models have been generated using laser scanners.

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